Development Fund

The Centre’s Development Fund, provided via a grant from Cancer Research UK, supports projects that facilitate new local interdisciplinary collaborations. Its aim is to provide funding for new research projects at an early stage. After this the expectation is that successful projects will lead to future project grants, new collaborations and interdisciplinary initiatives.

The projects are judged and ranked on the following criteria: Novelty of proposal, scientific quality, translational potential, feasibility of project, local synergy and future funding potential.

Early career investigators are strongly encouraged to apply. There is a maximum of one application per lead and a maximum of one co-application.

More details of the application requirements can be found in Development Fund Guidelines below. In 2014, the Development Fund awards focused on projects involving input from both chemical biologists and cancer biologists/clinicians in order to foster greater collaboration between these disciplines.

The call for applications is now closed.

Development Fund guidelines

The Development Fund supports projects that facilitate new local interdisciplinary collaborations. Its aim is to provide funding for new research projects at an early stage. After this the expectation is that successful projects will lead to future project grants, new collaborations and interdisciplinary initiatives.

The projects are judged and ranked on the following criteria: Novelty of proposal, scientific quality, translational potential, feasibility of project, local synergy and future funding potential.

Early career investigators are strongly encouraged to apply. There is a maximum of one application per lead and maximum of one co-application.

These terms of reference are to aid submission of proposals:

  • The most important quality that we are looking for is outstanding science with relevance to the remit of the Centre.
  • Applications that promote new collaboration links will be favoured strongly.
  • The proposal should be explicitly for a new project rather than to supplement existing research.
  • The project should have good prospects of future funding and should be feasible.
  • Each submission should be no more than one A4 page [font size no less than 11] and no more than 800 words, structured with an Abstract, Aims, Details of the project, References and Justification for the use of funds requested (no staff costs to be included). Applications that exceed one page will be rejected.
  • Applications are made via the Centre's website
  • If your application is successful, details will be published on the Centre’s website.
  • A report will be required within 3 months of the completion of the project. This must include details of how the funding was spent, any subsequent funding (pending or awarded) and research outcomes (presentations at meeting, publications, etc.). A poster and possible presentation may be required at one of our annual symposium.
  • Centre funding should be acknowledged in any presentations or publications.
  • Applicants should notify the committee if their proposed plans change significantly once funding has been awarded.
  • Division of funds: Awards will be for approx. £5,000, with a £10,000 maximum (£30,000 available per annum).

Development Fund ­committee members

Prof Anthony Chalmers
Prof Gavin Halbert
Prof Jim Neil
Dr Sylvia Morrison

Previous awards

2014

  • CXCL12 as an assay system for IKKalpha inhibitor drugs - Robin Plevin, University of Strathclyde
  • Investigating Ether Lipid Metabolism In Aggressive Oral Cancers - Emma Shanks, Beatson Institute
  • Radiosensitisation of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by development of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) delivery system for siRNA silencing of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) - Annette Sorensen, University of Strathclyde
  • Novel inhibitors of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 - David Breen, University of Strathclyde
  • A proof-of-concept study to establish a systematic approach for the discovery of allosteric sites in proteins - Nahoum Anthony, University of Strathclyde
  • Measurement of Small Molecule Pharmacokinetics in Invasive Regions of Glioblastoma - Tobias Postma, University of Glasgow
  • Investigation of a minor groove-binding polyamide to inhibit E2F1 in CML stem cells - Tessa Holyoake, University of Glasgow
  • Investigation of Tumour Metabolism for Cancer Diagnosis - Andrew Sutherland, University of Glasgow

2012

  • Comparative global transcriptome analysis of glioma stem like and bulk cells for identification of therapeutic targets - Shafiq Ahmed, University of Glasgow
  • Validation of a virtual screen for senescence agonists - Alan Bilsland, University of Glasgow
  • Splice switching small molecules as inducers of apoptosis - Glenn Burley, University of Strathclyde
  • Investigation of [18F]-Fluciclatide as a PET imaging agent for imaging angiogenesis in Glioblastoma - Anthony Chalmers, University of Glasgow
  • A pilot study to assess acute gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity in patients treated with flattening filter free (FFF) stereotactic ablative RT (SABR) for prostate cancer - Aileen Duffton, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre
  • Proof of principle: sLDL can deliver drugs to proliferating CLL cells within the bone marrow niche in vivo to reduce tumour burden - Heather Jorgensen, University of Glasgow
  • Metabolic vulnerabilities induced by Myc - Daniel Murphy, University of Glasgow
  • The epidemiology of human papillomavirus associated oropharyngeal cancers in the West of Scotland - Claire Paterson, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre
  • The relationship between genetic aberrations and CpG Island Methylator Phenotype in colorectal cancer - Arfon Powell, University of Glasgow
  • The role of nuclear sphingosine kinase 1 in colorectal cancer - Susan Pyne, University of Strathclyde
  • The effect of Dasatinib administration on metastases gene expression in early and late stage prostate cancer in vitro - Brian Stewart, University of Glasgow

2011

  • Role of increased Rho-ROCK signalling for inhibition of autophagy in solid tumour cancers - Ed Chan, University of Strathclyde
  • Functional studies of autophagy for in vivo survival of CML stem cells - Tessa Holyoake, University of Glasgow
  • To characterise how TKI therapy affects ROCK function in TKI-sensitive and resistant CML cells - Tessa Holyoake, University of Glasgow
  • Targeting proliferating CLL cells with a novel drug delivery system - Heather Jørgensen, University of Glasgow
  • Establishing a platform to investigate the potential of novel compounds for therapeutic development in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia - Alison Michie, University of Glasgow
  • Investigating the use of an EUS core biopsy needle versus a traditional FNA cytology aspiration technique in obtaining tumour tissue for diagnostic, IHC and kinome-signature analysis: Implications for biomarker development - Douglas Morran, Beatson Institute
  • To explore apoptotic cell clearance in wild-type and ROCK1nc mice - Mike Olson, Beatson Institute
  • Molecular imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy for cancer: Synthesis of a novel radiolabelled PARP-1 inhibitor - Andrew Sutherland, University of Glasgow
  • Testing the potential of PAR-2 as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer - Joanne Edwards, University of Glasgow
  • p53 mutation as a biomarker for response to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer - Patricia Roxburgh, Beatson Institute